Tuesday, January 30, 2007

The Funny Thing About Animals

I don't know what it is about me and animals, but they really effect me. Yesterday, the Kentucky Derby winning horse Barbaro was put down. I am not going to go into all the problems the horse has had. Unless you live in a cave (that doesn't get TV) you have heard all you want to hear about it.

My thing is that hearing about Barbaro's death effected me almost as much as my own dogs. I love animals - especially dogs and horses. There is something about them that pulls on my heartstrings.

As sad as it is, when I hear about a human death, even a child, it doesn't effect me like when an animal loses its life. I guess it has something to do with innocense. Humans have more power over their choices. Animals are here for us and usually are here to serve us or give us companionship. When they die, you know it wasn't because they made wrong choices - not in the sense that we have choices.

I followed Barbaro from the Derby to his tragic injury at the Preakness Stakes. When most owners would euthanize the animal right there on the spot, Barbaro's owners tried every course it could to save his life. I respect that. Every week, or so, I would read a blurb in the paper of how things are looking up for him. It was like checking on an old friend. Now the friend is gone and I do feel the loss.
I am still baffled how something like a leg injury can be so tragic for horses. I can't believe that technology hasn't caught up in the world of vetrinary medicine to overcome such problems. However, Barbaro is an example of how even after eight months after the leg injury, healing from it is still a long shot.

I think we will probably see that owners now because of the tragic ending of Barbaro's injury and treatment, will opt out of even going to the expense to try to save their horses. What I hope is that Barbaro will inspire new methods of treating horses with such injuries.
I know I am wrong for seemingly caring about things like this as much as I do. I guess I wished that people would earn my compassion more than they do.

2 comments:

Sayre said...

I wonder what it is. I was horrified at his accident and incredibly sad to hear that he'd had to be put down finally at long last. Those 8 months must have been terribly difficult for all involved.

I know nothing about horses. But I know that a broken leg is pretty much a death sentence. Why is that? I prefer the "Dreamer" way.

Anonymous said...

That's so sad...I guess a broken leg is to horses what a broken hip is to the elderly.

I love animals too, and get weepy at the thought of abuse or neglect.